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AMY BURRELL

Lic.Ac., M.B.Ac.C.

Professional Acupuncturist

AMY BURRELL

Lic.Ac., M.B.Ac.C.

Professional Acupuncturist

Treatments and Fees

Treatments & fees, what to expect, cancellation policy and availability.

Traditional Acupuncture

Traditional Acupuncture treatments

The focus for a traditional acupuncturist is on the patient as an individual and not just their specific illness, and all symptoms are seen as part of an interconnected pattern.

Treatment involves the insertion of very fine needles into specific points which are said to affect the flow of your body’s qi, or vital energy, although there is ongoing research and study that suggests what many practitioners already know: that inserting needles into the channels (or meridians) affects change within the human body, and the term ‘energy’ is rather simplistic.

A growing body of evidence-based clinical research is discovering how the body responds to acupuncture and its benefits for a wide range of common health conditions. Many people have acupuncture to relieve specific aches and pains such as osteoarthritis of the knee, TMJ pain, headaches and low back pain, or for common health problems like an overactive bladder. Other people choose acupuncture when they can feel their bodily functions are out of balance but have no obvious western medical diagnosis leading to western medical treatment. Many also have regular treatments simply because they find it beneficial and relaxing.

Cosmetic Acupuncture

This treatment involves the insertion of several small acupuncture needles in parts of the facial skin that may have lost elasticity, or where fine lines are visible, in order to stimulate the flow of blood and Qi (energy) to the area.

This is combined with firm Tui Na (Chinese massage), heat and derma roller.

Appropriate acupuncture points on the main meridian channels on the body are also selected to assist with detoxification, relaxation, and which correspond to the facial lines.

This can be done as a one off treatment, but is most beneficial when done more regularly as a course of treatments.

Facial Acupuncture treatments

Cupping

Cupping technique

Cupping is an ancient traditional Chinese technique which is generally used alongside acupuncture although it can be a stand-alone treatment on some occasions.

It involves creating a vacuum inside round glass cups, and either leaving them in place, or sliding them over the muscles in order to stimulate acupuncture points, or larger areas of the body.

It encourages the blood and Qi (energy) to flow more freely where there is stagnation.

Cupping is not painful, and many find it relaxing and pleasant. It can leave marks on the skin temporarily which clear over the course of a few days.

Gua sha

Gua sha is a traditional Chinese cleansing technique. It involves a round edged object to apply pressure in a scraping motion across the skin in areas of pain and stiffness, most commonly the neck and back.

It results in the appearance of small red or purple spots (petechiae) known as sha

According to traditional Chinese medicine, it moves qi (energy) and blood stagnation, believed to be the main cause of the pain and stiffness. As the blood is encouraged to move more freely, it is believed to encourage a cleansing action.

No damage is caused to the skin, and the sha fades over the course of a few days.

Gua sha cleansing technique

Fees

  • £60 for the initial diagnosis (up to 2 hours)
  • £40 follow on treatments at (up to 1 hour)
  • £50 for cosmetic acupuncture

Appointments are available during the week, with limited evening appointments also available; please contact me to discuss availability.

Cancellations require a minimum of 24 hours notice and appointments cancelled with less than 24 hours notice will be charged in full.

 

The current list of healthcare providers

There is a growing list of UK private health insurers whose policies allow for the full or partial refund of acupuncture treatment fees. If you do have a health plan then, it would be a good idea to see if some or all of the cost of your treatments are covered.The British Acupuncture Council website maintains a list for reference.

Acupuncture in Dunmow Essex

What to expect when you come for treatment

What happens when you have acupuncture

What happens when you come for treatment?

Your initial visit will take up to an hour and a half and consists of a personal and medical consultation covering your family history, lifestyle, systems functions (eg. sleep, appetite) and full details of your current complaint/s and any test or investigations that you have had.

You will also have the opportunity to discuss in complete confidence any concerns or troubles you may currently be dealing with. After your consultation I will carry out a number of short non-invasive physical diagnostic tests including blood pressure, temperature distribution and pulse taking. In most cases, aside from the most complex, this is then followed by your first treatment.

Subsequent appointments take up to one hour, and include discussion of your progress and your treatment to date.

What does acupuncture feel like?

What does it feel like?

Many patients are concerned that acupuncture maybe painful but as the needles are flexible and about as thick as two human hairs there is usually only a very slight sensation as it enters the skin.

Sometimes patients also feel a dull ache on the acupuncture point but this also only lasts for a few seconds and is generally not considered to be uncomfortable.

Many find acupuncture relaxing and feel very calm during and after a treatment; you may also feel a little tired or sleepy so if possible, try to arrange a relatively restful and quiet day, especially for your first treatment.

Is Acupuncture safe?

Is it safe?

Acupuncture is one of the safest medical treatments currently on offer in the UK, in fact in 2001 a number of studies concluded that the risk of serious adverse reaction to acupuncture is less than 1 in 10,000.

Any minor side effects that do occur, such as dizziness or bruising around needle points, are infrequent, mild and self-correcting.

To see more information regarding the safety of acupuncture please visit the British Acupuncture Council’s website.